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A lawyer representing four plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit alleging discrimination against white employees by American Express sent a letter to the company’s lawyers last week accusing the credit card behemoth of violating its own values.

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“Since we exposed AmEx’s discriminatory anti-white policies over a year ago, they have repeatedly called our allegations baseless and false,” lawyer David Pivtorak told FOX Business. “Now that so many employees across the country have shared similar experiences, AmEx wants to keep their stories under wraps.”

“American Express publicly brags about the trust and transparency of its peers,” Pivtorak tweeted last week. “But when workers unite against company-wide discrimination, AmEx tries to divide them and force them into secret legal proceedings against them. So I wrote to their lawyers denouncing the hypocrisy.”

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In a copy of the letter he attached to his tweet, Pivtorak wrote that he was responding to a request by Amex’s lawyers to dismiss the lawsuit “and force individual plaintiffs – and the thousands of workers they represent – into forced, secretive, one-man party arbitration.”

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Pivtorak went on to accuse Amex of “ridiculing” its own “Blue Box Values” that obligate colleagues to “transparency” and “fighting all forms of discrimination”, stating that “its recent actions seem to argue otherwise.”

On August 23, former American Express employee Brian Netzel filed a class-action lawsuit, alleging that the company showed “calling indifference” to civil rights law by firing him because he is white and speaking out against its “racially discriminatory” policies.

The lawsuit alleges that Amex implemented an “anti-racist” policy throughout its corporate structure following the death of George Floyd that “preferred people for being black and signaled unequivocally to white employees that their race is an obstacle to moving forward in the company.” .”

Netzel told FOX Business at the time that Amex’s racial policies generated “huge animosity” in the workplace. He argued that white employees were being unfairly penalized or let go due to promotions, while some black employees were only promoted to meet racial quotas, and that some felt entitled to “extirpate in McCarthy-era fashion people, who disagreed with this general philosophy. “

In September, three other plaintiffs joined the complaint, alleging they are being treated similarly.

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Amex denied the allegations in the lawsuit, with a spokesperson telling FOX Business, “The allegations made against our company by the four complainants and their attorney are completely baseless.”

Pivtorak told FOX Business that the company is “demanding a secret trial before carefully selected judges who work for the organization AmEx has paid to handle hundreds of its cases.”

“These are the types of forced, secret proceedings that allowed Harvey Weinstein and large corporate employers to engage in constant predatory behavior until Congress was finally forced to pass the Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Involuntary Arbitration Termination Act,” the lawyer continued. .

“In this case, forced arbitration is not only fundamentally unfair, but also ironic, given that AmEx constantly stakes its public reputation on how much it values ​​“transparency” and listens to the opinions of its employees,” Pivtorak added.

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An Amex spokesperson also took issue with language in Pivtorak’s letter that said there were “thousands” of employees in a similar position, stressing to FOX Business that only four plaintiffs were named in the lawsuit.

Pivtorak remained adamant in his wording, telling FOX Business that he believes there are indeed thousands of white employees who have been subjected to discriminatory policies by the company.

“The whole purpose of a class action is to have a few people represent many because a lawsuit involving hundreds or thousands of named members is next to impossible,” he said. “I think the sheer volume of responses to this case on the Internet and stories from people who identify themselves as current or former employees suggest that a huge number of people agree with our statements.”