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Well-known businesses in Long Beach, California are threatening to pack up and move if issues like crime, drug use and homelessness are not addressed, according to a local report.

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“Customers don’t feel safe,” District Wine owner Angela Mesna said this week, according to the Long Beach Business Journal. “My employees are afraid. We all carry pepper spray just to serve our customers in the parking lot.”

City leaders plan to meet Thursday to discuss the area’s crime problems and how to keep businesses like Mesna from moving out of the city center.

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“The situation in Downtown is desperate, sad and disappointing. We have very few options to keep our downtown spot,” Beachwood Brewing co-owner Gabriel Gordon wrote in an Oct. 27 email to Downtown Long Beach Alliance, a retail outlet. reported.

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In his email, he outlined the problems that plague these areas, including violence outside the restaurant, people openly using drugs, and others roaming these restaurants. In one instance, Gordon saw a couple fighting outside his establishment, causing the woman to pass out. However, when he called the police, no one showed up, he said.

Incidents, according to Gordon, reduce his profit by more than 25%.

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The CEO of the Downtown Long Beach Alliance forwarded Gordon’s email to city officials and detailed that the alliance had heard that other businesses were threatening to leave the area due to public safety concerns.

“While downtown has had issues over the past two years, a whole different level of issues have emerged in recent months regarding aggressive and erratic behavior in people who may be suffering from substance abuse or mental health issues,” Austin Metoyer said in a statement. his message. city ​​leaders, according to the Long Beach Business Journal.

He called for a meeting on Thursday to “look for sustainable solutions to overcome this pressing crisis.”

Highway near Long Beach, Cali

Mesna’s District Wine Cellar opened in 2009, and she says the city center now seems more dangerous than more than a decade ago. She plans to keep the business in the area for the next six months, but that could come sooner if other businesses close in the meantime.

“It almost becomes more devastating than the pandemic,” Mesna said.

“I love Downtown, I love Long Beach,” Mesna continued, “and my heart breaks when I see what’s going on.”

In recent weeks, other business leaders have sounded the alarm about public safety and the city’s homelessness crisis.

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“I fear for my safety and, of course, for my customers,” jewelry store owner Serina Lim told Fox 11 last month.

“I’m fed up, that’s why I’m talking,” Lim added.

Homeless camp near a golf course in Long Beach, California.

Some blame the problems on the fact that since 2020, the number of homeless people in Long Beach has skyrocketed by 62%. The Long Beach Business Journal reported that downtown property crime increased by 32% this year, and that even Billie Jean’s King’s Main Library was closed for about a month this year due to public safety concerns.

Meanwhile, downtown visitor traffic has dwindled, with the Downtown Long Beach Alliance reporting that 22.4% of office space was vacant in the second quarter of 2022.

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Fox News Digital reached out to Gordon and Mesna for more comment on the matter on Thursday morning, but received no immediate response.