Chicago vs. Dallas: Why the North Lags Behind the South and West in Racial Integration

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Americans’ continuing migration to the Sunbelt has helped make parts of the South and West generally less segregated than large metros in the Northeast and Midwest. Much of their growth has occurred since legal segregation ended, creating new neighborhoods and even new cities. In addition, their growth has been fueled by increasingly diverse immigration.

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John Logan, a Brown University professor who has studied segregation since the 1970s with different measures, has documented similar trends. He and his colleagues have identified an emerging pattern in which the arrival of Latinos and Asians in predominantly white neighborhoods doesn’t trigger white flight, even with the later arrival of Black residents. What he calls “global neighborhoods” have become increasingly common in diverse metros, especially in the fast-growing Sunbelt.

In the Northeast and Midwest, people of different races continue to live more separately because of patterns created after the huge migration of Black people from the South in the first half of the 20th century. When segregation was legal, Blacks were squeezed into strongly segregated neighborhoods, first in cities and later in postwar suburbs. Even after court decisions and legislation adopted from the 1940s to the 1970s ended legal segregation, residential segregation persisted in part because of lingering discrimination in education, employment, real estate and zoning, researchers say.

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Nationwide, whites and Blacks continue to live more separately from each other than any other pair of racial groups. The homes of Asians in some instances are becoming more clustered together as more move to the US, while Latinos are generally spreading out as their economic profile approaches national averages.

This segregation index was computed by researcher Benjamin Elbers to measure the relative distribution of whites, Blacks, Hispanics and Asians in the neighborhoods of more than 200 metro areas. Here are the results, shown on a scale where zero represents complete integration and 100, complete segregation.

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Credit: www.Businesshala.com /

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