FAA briefly grounded planes in Western U.S. as ‘precaution’ around time North Korea tested missile

- Advertisement -


  • The FAA said Tuesday that it halted departures at some West Coast airports on Monday evening, a precaution that occurred near the time of the North Korean ballistic missile launch. It is not clear whether the two incidents were linked.
  • Monday’s missile test was the second known North Korean launch in a week.

- Advertisement -

WASHINGTON – The Federal Aviation Administration said Tuesday it halted departures at some West Coast airports on Monday evening, a precaution that occurred near the time of the North Korean ballistic missile launch.

- Advertisement -

It is not clear whether the two incidents were linked.

The FAA said Tuesday it takes “regular precautionary measures. We are reviewing the process around this ground stop as we do after all such incidents.”

- Advertisement -

A US official told Reuters that the FAA halted operations for less than 15 minutes “due to early reports of incidents in the Indo-Pacific region” without being directly linked to the missile launch.

In a statement on Monday evening, Indo-Pacific Command of the US ArmyThe Geographical Combat Command, responsible for the region, confirmed North Korea’s ballistic missile launch.

“We are aware of the ballistic missile launch and are consulting closely with our allies and partners. Although we have assessed that the incident does not pose an immediate threat to US personnel or the region or our allies, the missile launch is unsustainable. exposes the impact of the DPRK’s illegal weapons program,” the command wrote, referring to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

According to South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff, Monday’s missile test, the second known North Korean launch in a week, began in the northern province of Jagang and traveled about 430 miles before falling into the East Sea.

Last week, Pyongyang said it had successfully tested a sophisticated hypersonic missile.

Meanwhile, Pentagon spokesman John Kirby said on Monday that the US was still assessing whether the test was a hypersonic missile that could be maneuvered.

All ballistic missile tests by North Korea are banned under UN Security Council resolutions.

The missile test, which follows a series of weapons tests in 2021, underscores third-generation North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s ambition to expand military capabilities amid stalled nuclear talks with the United States.

Under his rule, the reclusive state has conducted its most powerful nuclear test, launched its first intercontinental ballistic missile and threatened to send missiles into waters near US territory of Guam.

CNBC Leslie Joseph

,

- Advertisement -

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

DMCA / Correction Notice

Recent Articles

Related Stories

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox