Iran will return to nuclear talks after months of stalled negotiations, State Department says

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  • The State Department said nuclear deal talks with Iran would resume later this month.
  • Earlier this year, signatories to the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, began six rounds of full-day talks at several hotels in Vienna.
  • The 2015 JCPOA, partially brokered by the Obama administration, lifted sanctions on Iran that had crippled its economy and nearly halved its oil exports.

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WASHINGTON — The stalled nuclear talks in Iran will resume in late November, nearly five months after the last round of talks signed by the 2015 deal’s signatories, the State Department announced Wednesday.

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State Department spokesman Ned Price said during a press briefing that US Special Envoy for Iran Robert Malley would lead the US delegation to the seventh round of talks on November 29. Price said the US hopes all participants can achieve mutual benefits for complying with the deal.

Earlier this year, signatories to the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, began six rounds of full-day talks at several hotels in Vienna.

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The 2015 JCPOA, partially brokered by the Obama administration, lifted sanctions on Iran that had crippled its economy and nearly halved its oil exports. Along with the United States, France, Germany, the UK, Russia and China were also signatories to the agreement.

The other participants of the deal are also referred to as P5+1.

Iran agreed to end some of its nuclear program and open its facilities to more extensive international inspections in exchange for billions of dollars in sanctions relief.

In 2018, then-President Donald Trump kept a campaign promise and unilaterally withdrew the United States from the JCPOA, calling it “the worst deal ever.” Trump also reimposed sanctions already lifted on Tehran.

Following Washington’s exit from the historic nuclear deal, other signatories to the deal have struggled to keep the deal alive.

Since Trump’s decision to leave the deal, Tehran has expanded its uranium enrichment and storage far beyond the deal’s limits. In addition, Western powers are concerned about Iran’s ambitious progress in research and development in the nuclear sector.

The Trump administration’s “maximum pressure” campaign has dented Iran’s already strained economy and slashed oil exports, leading tensions between Tehran and Washington to peak.

The Biden administration has called for a return to the deal after talks stalled after the sixth round of talks in June.

The pause came as Iran elected a new president, Ibrahim Raisi, to succeed Hassan Rouhani.

In June, Raisi dismissed a meeting with Biden, which the White House dismissed as saying that the United States does not currently have diplomatic relations with Iran.

Raisi is expected to take a tough stand at talks in Vienna under individual US sanctions over allegations of human rights abuses.

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