Noncitizens Can Now Vote in New York City, Prompting GOP Lawsuit

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Republicans say a law giving new voting rights to 800,000 people violates the state’s constitution after backing Mayor Eric Adams

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On Saturday, New York City Mayor Eric Adams said he initially had some concerns about the length of residency requirements in the bill, but was reassured by speaking with bill supporters. He did not sign or veto the bill, allowing it to automatically become law for 30 days after its passage.

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With city council running in 2023, lawful permanent residents or people authorized to work in the US can vote in city elections if they have lived in five cities for 30 days or more and meet other requirements to vote. complete. The law does not give the right to vote to immigrants who enter the country illegally.

Republican plaintiffs, including New York City Council Minority Leader Joe Borelli and Staten Island Borough President Vito Fossella, said the law violates state election law and the New York State Constitution, which mandates that all citizens over the age of 18 vote. will be eligible for.

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“The non-citizen voting law is intended, and will be, to cause a sudden and major change in the makeup of voters, which will compel electoral-official plaintiffs to change the way they campaign for office and materialize their Will likely affect future electoral victories,” says the suit, which was filed in the State Supreme Court in Staten Island, the most Republican borough in New York City.

Mr. Adams, a lawsuit against the New York City Council and the city’s Board of Elections, seeks to invalidate the law and requests an order halting its implementation.

The Adams administration intends to vigorously defend the law in court, said Mr Adams’ spokesman, Jose Bayona.

A spokesman for the Board of Elections declined to comment, and a spokesman for the city council did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

Advocates of the new law anticipate a legal challenge, and say the state’s constitution has set a floor – not a limit – regarding who is allowed to vote in municipal elections.

“All of our focus should be on implementation and everyone getting a good, solid education so that we can be ready for our next municipal election in a couple of years,” said Carlos Menchaca, a Democratic councilman from Brooklyn who co-authored the legislation. Sponsored.

Write Jimmy Vielkind at [email protected]

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