Number of people quitting their jobs hits new high in September

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Many are re-evaluating their lives and work in the wake of the pandemic.

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The Labor Department said Friday that the number of job losses hit a record high in September.

Some 4.4 million workers, or 3% of the total workforce, left their jobs in September, the DOL said, marking the highest number since the government began tracking the data. In addition, the number of job openings in September stood at 10.4 million – the second highest figure ever recorded in August and only slightly less than the record 10.9 million job openings seen in July.

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Meanwhile, the layoff and discharge rate remained unchanged at 0.9% in September.

The latest data shows an ongoing trend among US workers who are re-evaluating their work conditions and lives after the shock of the pandemic.

Job losses in several industries increased in September, with the biggest growth in the arts, entertainment and entertainment sectors, and in the state and local government education industry, according to the data.

Rising job opportunities as well as record-high levels of people leaving jobs have left many large companies looking for employees. Workers now have an upper hand in the labor market which has been linked to strikes and new employee activism.

Thousands of John Deere employees are on strike and new unionization efforts have emerged at major companies including Amazon and Starbucks.

The crisis has also been linked to rising wages for workers as the economy reopens, particularly in the services industry where wages were largely stagnant before the pandemic.

Initial data from the labor department indicates that the average hourly earnings of all employees at food and beverage establishments hit a record high of $17.58 in September, a figure that has gradually climbed every month in 2021.

The overall unemployment rate remains high compared to pre-pandemic levels. The unemployment rate last month stood at 4.6%, which is still up from the 3.5% seen in February 2020, before the pandemic lifted the labor market.

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