Supreme Court to Settle Ted Cruz Fight With FEC Over Loan Reimbursement

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Texas Republican Senator Is Seeking Full Repayment of a $260,000 Personal Loan for His 2018 Election Campaign

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Seeking full reimbursement, the senator challenged that limitation on the grounds of free speech, saying that the cap burdened his right to speak freely in favor of his election. The FEC argued that the cap was a modest one that furthered the government’s legitimate interest in preventing corruption threats that could arise from donors making post-election contributions that effectively went directly to the winning official’s pocket. .

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A lower federal court agreed with Cruz, saying the reimbursement limit unlawfully burdened political speech protected by the First Amendment. The Supreme Court said it would review that decision.

The High Court opens its new term on Monday and will return to the courtroom for oral arguments for the first time since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. It will hear new cases early next year, with decisions expected by the end of June.

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In other new cases added to the docket Thursday, the court agreed to hear a First Amendment case from Boston in which a religious group is challenging the city’s refusal to fly the Christian flag on one of three flagpoles in front of Boston City Hall. .

A Christian organization called Camp Constitution alleged that the city unlawfully denied the request based on the group’s religious outlook. The group said the flagpole was a public platform that the city had made available to a wide range of other groups for ethnic and cultural gatherings and to promote certain causes such as gay pride.

The city said its policy was not to fly non-secular flags, citing constitutional prohibitions on the official establishment of religion. Boston said the flagpole was government property that it could use in a way that suited its goals.

A federal appeals court sided with the city, citing previous Supreme Court precedent, including a 2015 ruling in which judges ruled that the state of Texas could deny a request for a special license plate featuring the Confederate war flag. .

write to Brent Kendall [email protected] . Feather

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