The Omicron Variant May Be a Buying Opportunity, but Only for the Brave

- Advertisement -


The sharp sell-off in global markets on Friday is reducing, with the stock back on the ground in the early hours of Monday.

- Advertisement -

It’s too early for a redundancy in Friday’s class, but it may well be a knee-jerk, given the paucity of available information about the new Omicron version of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

- Advertisement -

We still don’t know enough to decide whether this is a buying opportunity — a bad title could well reignite a sell-off. Yet some developments have allayed fears for now. The World Health Organization advised countries to adopt a “risk-based and scientific approach”, cautioning against travel restrictions. WHO also said that no information To suggest that the traits associated with the variant are different from those of other strains. Health experts in South Africa have also described symptoms as mild.

Even in the worst-case scenario — the variant proves to be vaccine-busting — Moderna said it could have a modified vaccine ready as early as 2022.

- Advertisement -

This development, in particular, serves as a reminder that the world is in a far better place to deal with the pandemic than it was in March 2020.

Hedge Fund Manager Bill Ackman Said That If The Omicron Version Really Proves To Be Cause mild to moderate symptoms, even if it is more permeable, it will be bullish for the shares.

He may be right but for now it’s a big ‘if’, and unlikely to be fully answered, at least for some volatile and uncertain weeks.

,Callum Keon

*** Join Barron’s Senior Managing Editor Lauren R. Rublin and Deputy Editor Ben Levison this afternoon as they discuss the outlook for stocks, interest rates and companies in the news. Register here.

,

Omicron expands as G-7 health ministers discuss new edition

Governments around the world were trying to erect new barriers against the spread of a new coronavirus variant on Monday, as the WHO warned that the Omicron strain presents a “very high” global risk and in some areas of the world. This could have “serious consequences”.

What will happen next: While the world awaits more information about the new version and its response to vaccines – according to vaccine developers, it will take anywhere from two weeks to a few months – fears of the virus now have a greater economic impact than the virus itself. Is. ,

,Pierre Bryancon and Liz Moyer

,

Cyber ​​Monday starts with a mixed bag of Black Friday

Cyber ​​Monday began today with 62.8 million people planning to shop online or in store, the National Retail Federation said, after Black Friday introduced a mixed bag for retailers.

What will happen next: While shoppers told NRF that they completed 28% of their inventory in early November, December sales are projected to be up 10.5% compared to the same month last year, with consumers expected to spend an average of $997.73 Is.

,Janet H. Cho

,

Sunday concludes one of the busiest travel weeks in 2021

Sunday kicked off one of the busiest US travel weeks of the year, both on the roads and in the air, as Americans returned home from their Thanksgiving trip. The AAA predicted a 13% increase in people traveling on holidays, the biggest increase since 2005.

What will happen next: According to an upcoming Expedia report on 2022 Travel Trends, about 37% of American travelers are planning to travel abroad as well as to domestic destinations next year, CNBC informed of.

,Janet H. Cho

,

Maple syrup joins crude oil in supply-demand imbalance

Oil isn’t the only commodity experiencing a supply-demand imbalance. Canada’s federation, which produces 73% of the world’s maple syrup, will release about £50 million from its emergency stockpile, the biggest release in a season since 2008 and nearly half of what it has stored.

What will happen next: Sugar maples are becoming a source of ingredients for alternative food products and cosmetic uses such as anti-aging creams. The Post pointed out that climate change and logging are also threatening the supply of healthy trees.

,Janet H. Cho

,

Nissan plans $18 billion electrification push

Nissan Motor said Monday it will spend 2 trillion yen ($17.59 billion) over the next five years to accelerate the switch to electric vehicles and try to catch up to competition.

What will happen next: Shares of Nissan fell 5.6% on Monday, the worst performer among Japanese carmakers. Analysts were disappointed with the “Ambition 2030” plan, noting that it lags behind rivals.

,Pierre Briançon

,

Businesshala wants to hear from you

I’ve heard that I can avoid capital gains taxes on certain properties, a tax trick known as a ‘same type of exchange’. How do these work and when should I attempt this maneuver?

A Businesshala correspondent will answer this question shortly. In the meantime, send answers to any questions you may have at [email protected]

,

—Newsletter Edited by Liz Moyer, Camilla Imperial, Rupert Steiner

,

- Advertisement -

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

DMCA / Correction Notice

Recent Articles

Related Stories

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox