Today’s Question: What is the average price for ten people at Thanksgiving dinner?

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It’s time to talk turkey about the price of this year’s potatoes and gravy.

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Answer: $64.05, up 20% from last year!

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Question:

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Have you noticed inflation (increase in prices) in the things that you or your family buy in your life? Assuming you have an extra $10 to spend, what additional foods would you add to this list for Thanksgiving dinner? Research online to make sure you’re not spending more than $10. What are you thankful for this Thanksgiving season?

Here are prepared slides for today’s question that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (Axios):

“With all the decorations your Thanksgiving meal is expected to cost 20% more than last year.

Why this matters: Nearly every ingredient in the classic Thanksgiving feast is more expensive amid inflation, supply chain disruptions and avian flu, according to the American Farm Bureau’s annual Thanksgiving dinner survey.

News release: The survey, released Wednesday, found the average cost of a holiday meal for 10 people this year is up from $53.31 to $64.05 on average for 2021.

This is the costliest dinner in 37 years of the bureau’s holiday survey.

What they’re saying: “General inflation reducing consumers’ purchasing power is a contributing factor to the increase in the average cost of Thanksgiving dinner this year,” Roger Cryan, the bureau’s chief economist, said in a statement.

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Looking for more Thanksgiving-related resources? Be sure to check out the NGPF project: Plan a Friendsgiving Dinner

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About the Author: Mason Butts

After graduating from UCLA with a Master’s in Education, Mason spent 5 years as a science teacher at South Los Angeles Public High School. It is committed to supporting the holistic development of all students and empowering them to lead lives of relational, academic and financial success. Now based in the Bay Area, Mason enjoys facilitating professional development and partnering with faculty as they prepare students for a bright financial future. When Mason isn’t creating courses or planning training, he can be found bicycling, trying new foods, and exploring the great outdoors.



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