Wildfires produced record-breaking emissions this year from U.S. to Turkey

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  • The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service said on Monday that climate change-caused wildfires produced record amounts of carbon emissions this year in parts of Siberia, the US and Turkey.
  • The blaze also devastated Albania, Algeria, Greece, Italy, North Macedonia, Spain, and Tunisia.
  • Climate change has promoted warmer temperatures and drier conditions around the world, which have contributed to longer and more intense wildfire seasons.

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Scientists with the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service said on Monday that climate change-caused wildfires produced record amounts of carbon emissions this year in parts of Siberia, the US and Turkey.

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The rapid and prolonged blasts emit an estimated 1.76 billion tons of carbon – the equivalent of more than a quarter of the US’s annual carbon emissions.

According to Copernicus, the Sakha Republic in northeastern Siberia, Turkey and the western US recorded its highest wildfire emissions in 2021. The wildfires also ravaged Albania, Algeria, Greece, Italy, North Macedonia, Spain and Tunisia.

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Mark Parrington, senior scientist at Copernicus, said: “As the year draws to a close, we have experienced intense and prolonged wildfire activity over wide areas, some of which have been at levels not seen in the past few decades.” Huh.”

Human-caused climate change has fueled warmer temperatures and drier conditions around the world, which have contributed to longer and more intense wildfire seasons. 2020 was one of the warmest years on record, and 2021 is sure to be one of the 10 warmest years ever recorded.

In July, the Dixie fire began in Northern California and continued to burn for more than three months. It became the second largest wildfire in the history of the state. Fires in California, Canada and the US Pacific Northwest this year emitted some 83 million tons of carbon, and plumes of smoke from those blasts traveled across the Atlantic Ocean and reached large areas of Europe.

Many countries around the eastern and central Mediterranean also experienced severe wildfires for several days in the summer, leading to high concentrations of particulate matter and poor air quality. Fire in Turkey in July prompted widespread evacuation and killed thousands of animals.

“Drier and warmer regional conditions due to global warming increase the risk of flammability and fire risk of vegetation and this is reflected in the very large, rapidly developing and persistent fires that we are monitoring,” Parrington said. said. “It is clear from 2021 that climate change is providing the ideal environment for wildfires.”

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